Northwest Scientific Association Grants Competition

Northwest Scientific Association Grants Competition

The Northwest Scientific Association (NWSA) is calling for applications for its 2018 Student Research Grant Competition! The NWSA annually awards grants to support student research in the pure and applied sciences conducted in the Northwest. Research grants are up to $750 for winning undergraduate and up to $1,500 for winning graduate proposals.
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Canvasback Lake Fall 2016

Job Announcement: eScience Program Specialist

The eScience Institute at the University of Washington has an outstanding opportunity for a Program Specialist (Job #152177). The eScience Institute’s mission is to support researchers across disciplines in developing and applying advanced computational methods and tools to real world problems. With funding from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P.
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GEOL 4015: Geology for Engineers in the Caribbean

GEOL 4015: Geology for Engineers in the Caribbean

Summer Geology for Engineers Course in the Caribbean GEOL 4015, University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Instructor: Dr. Stephen Hughes June 12 – July 9, 2018 GEOL 4015 Course Page The Geology Department is opening this course to students in Puerto Rico and the remainder of the United States.
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Designing River Flows to Manage Both Food & Energy Demands

Designing River Flows to Manage Both Food & Energy Demands

The Mekong River provides food for nearly 60 million people across 6 different countries. The 8th largest river in the world, the Mekong supports the largest lake and wetland in Southeast Asia, Tonle Sap Lake, which boasts an annual fishery harvest of roughly 250,000 tonnes. Dam construction along the Mekong and its tributaries may provide a clean energy source to this region of the world, but it also threatens freshwater fisheries critical for local livelihoods.
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Riparian ecosystems threatened by changing flood & drought conditions

Riparian ecosystems threatened by changing flood & drought conditions

Human demand for freshwater has resulted in substantial alterations to the natural flow pattern of rivers all over the world. Dams and other water diversion infrastructure impact riparian ecosystems by decreasing flooding frequency and interrupting valuable ecosystem services such as habitat availability and nutrient cycling. Simultaneously, climate change threatens riparian ecosystems by increasing flow intermittency and drought frequency.
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Freshwater researchers hope that their advances in understanding floods in coastal Washington watersheds will eventually be useful for giving local residents more warning for when flood waters will be reaching their properties.  In the photo below, Greg Platt moves bicycles to higher ground during a November (2015) flood of the Skagit River near Sedro-Woolley, WA, where heavy rainfall regularly pushes the Skagit River above its flood level.   During this flood, Platt said "It's not too bad right now, it won't get much higher than this"

Prediction Of and Resilience Against Extreme Events: Landslides and Floods (NSF-PREEVENTS)

Damage from natural disasters can be prevented by using predictions to improve our planning. With the objective of improving flood and landslide prediction, a collaborative researcher team led by University of Washington Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) has received a four-year $1.7 million National Science Foundation (NSF) Prediction of and Resilience Against Extreme Events (PREEVENTS) grant.
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Geo-Spatial Tools

Geo-Spatial Tools

Geohackweek Tutorials for Freshwater Research and Education   Freshwater research using large data with computationally intensive analyses is an area of ongoing development.  CUAHSI staff and University of Washington Freshwater researchers are partnering with eScience Geohackweek organizers  to provide ongoing access to tutorials developed for Geohackweek 2017, as well as helpful links available on HydroShare Help pages.  
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Water Recovery Working Group

Water Recovery Working Group

Water Recovery Working Group Upcoming Events, Classes, and Information:   **Please scroll down to read all current and past posts** *No current posts to display. Please check back later*
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Sediment Working Group

Sediment Working Group

Overview: The sediment working group is comprised of University of Washington faculty, researchers and students from CEE, ESS, SEFS and APL and partners from the US Geological Survey and National Park Service. The group is working to understand sediment processes in Puget Sound watersheds, focused in particular on observed or expected changes in these processes driven by shifts in land-use, climate or other factors, which may impact flooding.
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Education Working Group

Education Working Group

Education Working Group Upcoming Events, Classes, and Information: **Please scroll down to read all current and past posts** [Course Announcement]: Water Resource Economics WATER RESOURCE ECONOMICS: Evans School of Public Policy 547 The course is designed for graduate students with backgrounds in public policy, engineering, hydrology, marine affairs or forestry that are interested in learning how economic tools can be applied to water resources policy.
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