Freshwater researchers hope that their advances in understanding floods in coastal Washington watersheds will eventually be useful for giving local residents more warning for when flood waters will be reaching their properties.  In the photo below, Greg Platt moves bicycles to higher ground during a November (2015) flood of the Skagit River near Sedro-Woolley, WA, where heavy rainfall regularly pushes the Skagit River above its flood level.   During this flood, Platt said "It's not too bad right now, it won't get much higher than this"

Flood and landslide risk research funded by $1.7 million NSF grant

Damage from natural disasters can be prevented by using predictions to improve our planning. With the objective of improving flood and landslide prediction, a collaborative researcher team led by University of Washington Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) has received a four-year $1.7 million National Science Foundation (NSF) Prediction of and Resilience Against Extreme Events (PREEVENTS) grant.
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Spring 2017 Course: Water Resource Economics

Spring 2017 Course: Water Resource Economics

Spring Course Announcement! The course is designed for graduate students with backgrounds in public policy, engineering, hydrology, marine affairs or forestry that are interested in learning how economic tools can be applied to water resources policy. Students will gain familiarity with the basic economic insights into water scarcity problems, including static and dynamic efficiency for consumers and producers.
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Engineering Washington: Sustainable Water in a Wet Region

Engineering Washington: Sustainable Water in a Wet Region

The Mountain to Sea Initiative at UW is supporting an Education working group. We hope this summer course is the first of many innovative courses bringing a watershed perspective to our classrooms and our students to the watersheds.  Please forward this course description to your colleagues, students, and email listservs.Please forward this course description to your colleagues, students, and email listservs.  
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