Interdisciplinary Freshwater Exploration Series on Dams

Interdisciplinary Freshwater Exploration Series on Dams

Hosted by the UW Freshwater Initiative and the UW Simpson Center for Humanities Are you a graduate student interested in broadening your understanding of the complex freshwater challenges facing society? Do you want to explore the multi-faceted challenges of dams with students, faculty, and practitioners from a diversity of fields?
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Diagnosing Urban Stream Syndrome

Diagnosing Urban Stream Syndrome

Identifying Novel Contaminants and Toxicants in Our Stormwater In rapidly urbanizing areas of the Unites States, stormwater runoff is a major water quality and treatment problem because it accumulates many harmful chemicals from our homes, roads, and cities as it flows downstream. However, the chemical make-up of urban stormwater runoff is poorly understood, even though it is known to be harmful to fish and aquatic ecosystems (often called “urban stream syndrome”).
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Introducing: WaterHackWeek 2019

Introducing: WaterHackWeek 2019

The University of Washington Freshwater Initiative and eScience Institute are proud to present the 1st annual WaterHackWeek! What is WaterHackWeek? WaterHackWeek is a 5-day collaborative workshop event to be held at the University of Washington in conjunction with the eScience Institute from March 23-31, 2019. Participants will learn about open source technology, models, and data for conducting state-of- the-art freshwater research.
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RAPID: Almost Like Maria

RAPID: Almost Like Maria

On September 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico as a first Category 4 storm.  With sustained winds of 155 miles per hour, just two miles per hour shy of a Category 5 classification, and three times the rainfall of Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Maria decimated Puerto Rico’s infrastructure, denying 3.1 million people power or access to clean water.
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HydroShare: Online, Hydrologic Collaboration Environment

HydroShare: Online, Hydrologic Collaboration Environment

The sharing of water-related data facilitates collaboration and promotes efficiency when it comes to water quality, extreme event prediction, or ecosystem science.  As research trends more and more towards “team science,” the ability to share resources between team members and across institutions is more valuable than ever.  
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Freshwater researchers hope that their advances in understanding floods in coastal Washington watersheds will eventually be useful for giving local residents more warning for when flood waters will be reaching their properties.  In the photo below, Greg Platt moves bicycles to higher ground during a November (2015) flood of the Skagit River near Sedro-Woolley, WA, where heavy rainfall regularly pushes the Skagit River above its flood level.   During this flood, Platt said "It's not too bad right now, it won't get much higher than this"

Prediction Of and Resilience Against Extreme Events: Landslides and Floods (NSF-PREEVENTS)

Damage from natural disasters can be prevented by using predictions to improve our planning. With the objective of improving flood and landslide prediction, a collaborative researcher team led by University of Washington Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) has received a four-year $1.7 million National Science Foundation (NSF) Prediction of and Resilience Against Extreme Events (PREEVENTS) grant.
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Coastal Rainforest Margins Research Network (NSF-RCN)

Coastal Rainforest Margins Research Network (NSF-RCN)

The Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center, the University of Washington, and the University of Alaska have been funded through The National Science Foundation Research Coordination Network to identify and develop a collaborative international research community designed to quantify the flux of nutrient-rich materials from coastal watersheds to nearshore marine ecosystems.
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Researchers gathered sediment cores from lakes in 16 major watersheds in southwestern Alaska.
Source: Lauren Rodgers

Mountains to Sea Initiative

The Mountain to Sea Initiative is designed to catalyze innovative research relevant to coastal watersheds in the Pacific Northwest and worldwide. Mountain to Sea (M2S) seeks to generate a new integrative research agenda within the UW freshwater sciences community and address key challenges facing coastal ecosystems in partnership with scientific and governmental organizations who contribute to and use water science.
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Photo: Thomas Pool

Food, Water, and Energy Dynamics in the Mekong River

The Mekong River and its watershed are facing unprecedented changes from land cover conversion, hydropower development, and climate change. This uncertain future threatens the livelihoods of over 60 million people living in the basin.  Since the early 2000’s, faculty, students, and staff from the University of Washington have partnered with local scientists to conduct multi-disciplinary science research that has led to a much better understanding of river hydrology, sediment dynamics, and carbon cycling.
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