Designing Rivers Flow to Manage Both Food & Energy Demands

Designing Rivers Flow to Manage Both Food & Energy Demands

The Mekong River provides food for nearly 60 million people across 6 different countries. The 8th largest river in the world, the Mekong supports the largest lake and wetland in Southeast Asia, Tonle Sap Lake, which boasts an annual fishery harvest of roughly 250,000 tonnes. Dam construction along the Mekong and its tributaries may provide a clean energy source to this region of the world, but it also threatens freshwater fisheries critical for local livelihoods.
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Riparian ecosystems threatened by changing flood & drought conditions

Riparian ecosystems threatened by changing flood & drought conditions

Human demand for freshwater has resulted in substantial alterations to the natural flow pattern of rivers all over the world. Dams and other water diversion infrastructure impact riparian ecosystems by decreasing flooding frequency and interrupting valuable ecosystem services such as habitat availability and nutrient cycling. Simultaneously, climate change threatens riparian ecosystems by increasing flow intermittency and drought frequency.
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Freshwater researchers hope that their advances in understanding floods in coastal Washington watersheds will eventually be useful for giving local residents more warning for when flood waters will be reaching their properties.  In the photo below, Greg Platt moves bicycles to higher ground during a November (2015) flood of the Skagit River near Sedro-Woolley, WA, where heavy rainfall regularly pushes the Skagit River above its flood level.   During this flood, Platt said "It's not too bad right now, it won't get much higher than this"

Flood and landslide risk research funded by $1.7 million NSF grant

Damage from natural disasters can be prevented by using predictions to improve our planning. With the objective of improving flood and landslide prediction, a collaborative researcher team led by University of Washington Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) has received a four-year $1.7 million National Science Foundation (NSF) Prediction of and Resilience Against Extreme Events (PREEVENTS) grant.
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Students Invited to Freshwater! 2017

Students Invited to Freshwater! 2017

Dear UW graduate students conducting freshwater research, Hello, my name is Claire Beveridge. I’m a 3rd year PhD Student studying Civil and Environmental Engineering with an emphasis in Hydrology. My research is highly interdisciplinary, focusing on the interactions and feedbacks between water, sediment, people and infrastructure.
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Canvasback Lake Fall 2016

Watershed Perspective: July 2017

Welcome to the Freshwater Blog! We have heard from government and professional leaders from both the State of Washington and our federal government that we need to train a generation of scientists that can join professional teams of experts, get wet in the water, dirty in the data, and understand complex systems of science and human interactions.
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Zooniverse: August 2017

Zooniverse: August 2017

Citizen Scientists Help Improve Our Understanding of Forest-Snow Interactions Imagine having hundreds of thousands of images like the ones below and needing to classify the snow in the trees and clouds in the sky. It would surely be great to have thousands of people willing to help, but how would you go about finding them?
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