Freshwater researchers hope that their advances in understanding floods in coastal Washington watersheds will eventually be useful for giving local residents more warning for when flood waters will be reaching their properties.  In the photo below, Greg Platt moves bicycles to higher ground during a November (2015) flood of the Skagit River near Sedro-Woolley, WA, where heavy rainfall regularly pushes the Skagit River above its flood level.   During this flood, Platt said "It's not too bad right now, it won't get much higher than this"

Prediction Of and Resilience Against Extreme Events: Landslides and Floods (NSF-PREEVENTS)

Damage from natural disasters can be prevented by using predictions to improve our planning. With the objective of improving flood and landslide prediction, a collaborative researcher team led by University of Washington Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE) has received a four-year $1.7 million National Science Foundation (NSF) Prediction of and Resilience Against Extreme Events (PREEVENTS) grant.
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Water diplomacy skills for academic researchers

Water diplomacy skills for academic researchers

Join us on October 10, 2017 for a skill-building seminar where we will discuss how to engage diverse communities in water research and science-based adaptive management strategies. Water diplomacy skills for academic researchers: focusing conversations for their usability and your productivity Where: University of Washington, Seattle Campus, eScience Institute located in the Washington Research Foundation Data Science Studio, on the 6th floor of the Physics/Astronomy Tower When: October 10, 2017  12:00- 1:00  pm,   followed by coffee and light refreshments.
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Students Invited to Freshwater! 2017

Students Invited to Freshwater! 2017

Dear UW graduate students conducting freshwater research, Hello, my name is Claire Beveridge. I’m a 3rd year PhD Student studying Civil and Environmental Engineering with an emphasis in Hydrology. My research is highly interdisciplinary, focusing on the interactions and feedbacks between water, sediment, people and infrastructure.
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